Raising chickens

Wanting to have dual purpose meat and egg birds, we ordered a batch of fertilised Light Sussex eggs, all the way from WA (closest we could find them).

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Into the incubator for 21 days, with the last 3 days ‘off rotation’ so they did not turn, increased the humidity and decreased the temperature.

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They hatched over a 24 hour period and we left them in there to dry (they get food from the yolk for the first 24 hours).

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We then put them into a brooder pen and taught them to eat and drink, which they did wonderfully, and slowly turned into yellow, fluffy chicks! We had a few with wonky feet and one that could not walk who had to be euthanised, but the rest were all fine.

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We changed their feeders so they didn’t get the bedding into it, and kept the light on most of the time due to it being so cold here.

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In warmer temperatures we would have put them outside into a grower pen at 3 weeks, but we waited 6 weeks (coinciding with the hatching of new baby chicks). We moved them outside into the glasshouse at 4 weeks to experience night time temperatures.

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Finally, with their grower pen ready, off they went at 6 weeks (my have they grown) and gave them a special treat of maggots bred especially.

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Now the new chicks are beginning to hatch and the older ones will be ready to go onto grower pellets in two weeks 🙂

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